The Paris Agreement is an agreement within the framework of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that deals with the reduction, adaptation and financing of greenhouse gas emissions from 2020. The agreement aims to address the threat of global climate change by keeping global temperatures well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels this century and to continue efforts to further limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. [1] The Paris Agreement is an environmental agreement that was adopted in 2015 by almost all nations to address climate change and its negative consequences. The agreement aims to significantly reduce global greenhouse gas emissions in order to limit global temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels this century, while continuing to pursue ways to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees. The agreement provides for the commitment of all major emitters to reduce their pollution from climate change and to strengthen these commitments over time. It provides developed countries with a means to assist developing countries in their mitigation and adaptation efforts and establishes a framework for monitoring, reporting and strengthening countries` individual and collective climate goals. While formal adherence to the agreement is simple, the biggest challenge for a Biden administration would be to present a new U.S. NDC, widely seen as ambitious and credible. The Paris Agreement came into force on 4 November 2016 after completing the ratification requirement by at least 55 countries, representing at least 55% of global greenhouse gas emissions. All EU countries have ratified the agreement. Although the United States and Turkey are not parties to the agreement, as they have not indicated their intention to withdraw from the 1992 UNFCCC, they will continue to be required, as an “Annex 1” country under the UNFCCC, to end national communications and establish an annual inventory of greenhouse gases. [91] The Paris Agreement provides for a number of binding procedural obligations. The parties are committed to preparing, communicating and maintaining successive NDCs; “domestic mitigation measures” to achieve their NDCs; report regularly on their emissions and on progress in implementing their NDCs.

The agreement also provides that the successive NDCs of each party “will represent a progression” beyond their previous one and “reflect its highest possible ambitions.” Obtaining their NDC by a party is not a legally binding obligation. Article 28 of the agreement allows the parties to terminate the contract following a notification of an appeal to the custodian. This notification can only take place three years after the agreement for the country comes into force. The payment is made one year after the transfer. Alternatively, the agreement provides that the withdrawal of the UNFCCC, under which the Paris Agreement was adopted, also withdraws the state from the Paris Agreement. The terms of the UNFCCC`s exit are the same as those of the Paris Agreement. There is no provision in the agreement for non-compliance. The Paris Agreement reaffirms the obligations of industrialized countries to the UNFCCC; the COP`s decision attached to the agreement extends the target of $100 billion per year until 2025 and calls for a new target that, in addition, “extends over $100 billion a year.” The agreement also broadens the donor base beyond developed countries by encouraging other countries to provide “voluntary” support. China, for example, pledged $3 billion in 2015 to help other developing countries.

Adaptation issues were at the forefront of the paris agreement.